General events

Wells Cathedral is committed to hosting events for the whole community, near and far, on topics that affect us all.

Dying Matters

Saturday 11th August from 9.45am – 12.30pm

Wells Cathedral, Diocese of Bath & Wells and St Margaret’s Hospice: A partnership event, because Dying Matters

The morning workshop is an excellent training opportunity for anyone involved in Pastoral work. It is also of value to everyone wanting to consider this little-discussed aspect of being human.

The programme comprises:

  • A short video by the NHS
  • A performance of ‘Outside the Box’: A Live Show about Death’ with Liz Rothschild
  • A discussion with a panel of professionals:
  1. Ann Lee, Chief Executive Officer of St Margaret’s Hospice
  2. Revd Canon Ian Ainsworth-Smith, Adviser on Healthcare Chaplaincy, Diocese of Bath and Wells
  3. Ann Fulton, Spiritual Care Coordinator at St Margaret’s Hospice
  4. Prebendary Dr Alison Perham, Retired Specialist in Palliative Medicine
  5. Liz Rothschild, Performer, performer, celebrant and award-winning burial ground owner
  • Reflection Activity
  • Refreshments

Tickets £5. Places are limited and must be booked in advance; no entry on the day.

Book via Eventbrite ‘Dying Matters, Wells Cathedral’

‘Outside the Box: A Live Show about Death’ is written and performed by Liz Rothschild, performer, celebrant and burial ground owner.

The show is described as “informative, uplifting and life affirming.”

“I loved this show! I can’t think of anything quite like it. Liz manages to talk about something that affects us all, but we never talk about. She makes it both every day and profound, and moves us to laughter and tears. She also empowers us, not in a wishy washy way, but with real concrete recipes for action. It’s a really useful show.”

Mike Kenney, Olivier Award Winning Playwright

For more information visit www.fullcircleproductions.org.uk

Contact Miranda Young with any queries on 01749 674483 or miranda.young@wellscathedral.uk.net

Ascent to the Rose of Divine Love – Cosmological symbolism in the design of Wells Cathedral

A SLIDESHOW TALK BY TOM BREE: Saturday 6th October from 7.00 – 8.45pm

The rose is said to have grown in the Garden of Eden albeit without any thorns. The rose gained its thorns as a result of the fall and henceforth rose thorns represent the passions – the suffering of this world as symbolised by the crown of thorns. The return of the soul to its Divine Image thus requires an ascent to the Rose of Divine Love as symbolised in medieval chivalric symbolism by a heavenly female – a ‘rose with no thorns’. Such a journey of return involves the soul’s ascent from this earthly realm back up to its heavenly origin where it can once again be crowned with roses and gaze face to face upon its own True Image.

Symbolism such as this appears to have been used within the design of Wells Cathedral. The ‘ascent’ from the west door ‘up’ to the rose-filled Lady Chapel at the east end embodies the journey of the soul eastward towards the rising of the Bright Morning Star – an epithet used both for the Risen Christ and the Virgin Mary who is Herself described as a rose with no thorns.

This talk will take place in the Nave of Wells Cathedral beginning at 7.00pm. Q&A and discussion between 8.15pm and 8.45pm.

Admission: £5.00
Tickets available from the Cathedral Box Office (01749672773) and on the door.
All proceeds go to support the work of Wells Cathedral.

Knit and Natter Poppies Appeal

As part of the events and services commemorating the centenary of the end of World War 1, Wells Cathedral is planning on putting on a unique exhibition of knitted or crocheted poppies.

If you can knit or crochet please join in. More information on the Poppies Exhibition Appeal, Knitting Patterns for Poppies K&N and Crochet Patterns for Poppies plus details of the Knit & Natter group in the Cathedral café can be found here.

 

 

The Golden Rule in Today’s World

On the afternoon of Tuesday 6 February 2018, the Cathedral held a free public seminar on ‘The Golden Rule in Today’s World’, hearing from these various faith perspectives.

A full Education Room listened to presentations on the theme of “Who is my brother? Who is my sister?” “Love Thy Neighbour” “Treat others as you would like to be treated.” Here was a chance to explore the common ground, and possible differences, in the religious traditions of our world, with representatives of the Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish and Sikh traditions.

After the talks, the audience asked questions investigating the idea of ‘Who is my Neighbour?’ in the context of contemporary political events as well as the human condition generally. The panel members demonstrated wisdom and humour, gaining respect from the audience for their candour. The audience clearly valued this opportunity to explore and engage with other faiths.

Our thanks go to the cathedral’s newly appointed Canon Theologian, David Thomas. Professor Thomas chaired both morning and afternoon sessions, skilfully navigating the questions and responses to provide balanced participation.